Category Archives: David Oyelowo

The Butler. Forest Whitaker. Oprah Winfrey. Trailer.

A look at the life of Eugene Allen, who served eight presidents as the White House’s head butler from 1952 to 1986, and had a unique front-row seat as political and racial history was made.

The film is inspired and based on Wil Haygood’s Washington Post article about a black man — Eugene Allen — who served as White House butler under eight presidents for over thirty years.

Lincoln. Theatrical Trailer. Steven Spielberg.

As the Civil War nears its end, President Abraham Lincoln clashes with members of his cabinet over the issue of abolishing slavery.

A Raisin In The Sun (on Television)

RR Watch: A Raisin In The Sun (Television)

Audra McDonald, Bill Nunn, David Oyelowo, John Stamos, Kenny Leon, Phylicia Rashad, Ron Cephas Jones, Sanaa Lathan, Sean Combs and Sean Patrick Thomas star in A Raisin In The Sun.

Sean "Diddy" Combs’ Raisin In The Sun

RR Watch: Kenny Leon’s A Raisin In the Sun

Director Kenny Leon’s A Raisin In the Sun premiered at Sundance Film Festival. Based on Lorraine Hansberry’s 1959 Broadway play, A Raisin in the Sun. The show was the first play written by an African American woman to be produced on Broadway.


WireImage

Synposis: During the 1950’s in Chicago’s South Side, the struggling Younger family anxiously await the arrival of a $10,000 life insurance check made out to Lena Younger, the family matriarch, from the estate of her late husband, Walter Lee. Lena would like to retire from her job as a domestic for a white family and dreams of escaping the claustrophobic, one-room tenement apartment to own a house, a dream she shared with her late husband. Her son Walter Lee, Jr., currently employed as a chauffeur, hopes to own a liquor store business. His wife Ruth is also a domestic in a white household and also hopes to live in a larger home. His sister Beneatha wants to go to medical school while also being pursued by two very different suitors. One is a wealthy black man preoccupied with superficial things while the other is a fellow classmate who peaks her interest in exploring her intellectual and spiritual roots in Africa.

When Lena decides to buy a home in an all-white residential neighborhood, the Younger family meets resistance from the home improvement association who are against the prospect of a black family moving into their neighborhood. To complicate things, Walter’s business investment goes awry and the family’s dreams and future seem lost along with the money.